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this cease-fire possible. called egyptian president mahmoud morsi, and benjamin netanyahu. president obama reiterated the united states believes israel has the right to defend itself. also said the united states would take this moment to work towards helping israel to further secure the region. but also talked about the importance of trying to achieve a broader security agreement in the region. and in speaking to egyptian president mahmoud morsi, president obama really thanked him for playing such a pivotal role. the white house saying that is one of the big things that came out of the past several days, alex. that president obama and egyptian president mahmoud morsi spent a lot of time talking on the phone. by some accounts they had six conversations in several details. and through those conversations, president obama and president morsi really strengthened their relationship. there was a question surrounding president morsi in part because of his ties to the muslim brotherhood, and feld morsi was pragmatic and they were on the same page in wanting to broker a cease-fire. that could have
these protests. is it all over morsi granting himself these further powers? >> reporter: yes, alex, it is about that. he came out, by the way, a good hour ago to talk, to speechify about the presidential powers. that's about four or five miles away from what you're describing, which is at tahrir square, the famous tahrir square. morsi spoke to his supporters saying that he had to do this to break really what is a log jam in writing up a new constitution. he was saying much of the judiciary are very honorable people but there are five or six or seven bad eggs, if you will. these are remnants of the mubarak regime and they're constantly interfering with the process. meanwhile, the country is continuing to be mired in poverty, a lack of social justice and what have you. so he says to protect the revolution, to protect the principles of the revolution and to protect this country's forward movement towards democracy he needed to do this to keep the constitution and the writing of the constitution moving forward. >> now, jim, if he does this, it's been reported he says he will do this just as long as
the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the new york times" you can actually see the turnaround in president obama's thinking about morsi. it started out to be mistrustful of him but warming up to him the more he worked with the guy and frankly the mor
. the sixth straight day of protest after morsi issued his decree last thursday. earlier today, the protest turning violent on a street near tahrir square. at least three protesters have been killed since the weekend. nbc live from cairo. and the crowd in tahrir square has been growing, building over the past hours. explain what we're seeing now. >> reporter: well, behind me, probably tens of thousands of egyptians have gathered, been here since the early hours of the morning. in fact, some have been camped out for the past six days. many songs, chants, slogans reminiscent of two years ago, calling on the same things they did two years ago, which is for the president of egypt to step down. they've changed the name, obviously, to reflect egypt's new islamist president. you mentioned that incident today with the tear gas and the police, that took place outside the u.s. embassy. riot police there fired tear gas and rubber bullets to try to keep the crowds at bay. one of the central issues of the protesters behind me is that since the end of the revolution, egypt's police force has not been ref
morsi. it is less than 24 hours old. there is deep mistrust. civilians on both sides hoping the agreement will bring a permanent end to the deadly air strikes and rocket fire. in gaza with the i have latest, eamon, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. for the first time in nine days the people of gaza were able to go about their business as usual in a place that usually is not very normal. so, for the first time they were able to wake up today after cease-fire declared last evening and shops and stores reopened people going back to their homes. throughout this conflict 9,000 or so palestinians were displaced from their homes. they took up shelters in u.n. schools. today for the first time able to go back, survey damage in some of the areas and try to get their lives back to normal. in gaza city, tens of thousands of supporters of hamas and other palestinian factions that have been fighting over the past nine days came out to the streets in what is described as a victory rally. the leaders of hamas came out thanked the palestinian people for the steadfast support. they ce
mohamed morsi played in actually trying to broker this makes all of the logic in the world that we should be trying to foster communication between all of the sides and not ignore one party over the other. >> diana, how challenging is it for hamas to put under its tent, under its umbrella, if you will, splinter groups, offshoots, factions that they necessarily don't have control over? is that where a lot of the problem lies? >> no. the problem largely lies in the fact that there have been competing strategies in terms of how to address israel's occupation. on the one hand abbas said we are only going to pursue negotiations and we've seen those have failed and other sides who have said that clearly the negotiations aren't working. clearly the negotiations have failed and, therefore, we have to pursue another strategy of defending ourselves. now in order for this to move forward, for us as palestinians to be able to move forward and to get this, to actually begin to hold israel accountable, there has to be a unified strategy and all palestinians have come forward and said that they want to
square in cairo after the new egyptian president morsi gave himself sweeping new powers today. tahrir square also the heart of last year's uprising. demonstrators filled the streets of alexandria later today. morsi's new powers put his own decisions above all legal challenges until a new egyptian parliament is elected. despite the protests, morsi moving ahead with his plans at the same time insisting that his new powers are for the good ofu issued a statement moments ago saying in part, quote, we call for calm and encourage all parties to work together and call for all egyptians to resolve their differences over these important issues peacefully and through democratic dialogue. jim maceda will join us coming up in 20 minutes right here. >>> turning from egypt now to the border between israel and gaza where a two-day cease fire is already being tested. israeli troops shot and killed a 20-year-old man on the gaza side of the line today. the first death since the truce. nbc news reporting that the man was trying to get to his family farm. we have coverage from both sides of the border to
egyptian president mohammed morsi who played the critical role. he is facing protests in his own country because he's trying to expand and have further reaching powers. do you see this as a power grab? that he's riding on something of a success? >> churchill once said democracy is the worst possible form of government except for anything else that's been tried by human beings. as senate majority leader, faced with constant delay, frustration, filibustering, i often thought, boy, i would like to be king for a day and cut through all of this. democracy is tough. it's messy and morsi is finding that out. i don't think that what he did was right, and i don't think it will hold. >> with regard to what he's doing now by ordering some retrials in terms of hosni mubarak and his cabinet, what might that do to the situation there? do you worry that would have inflaming factions there? >> i think it clearly will trigger protests. had already has for many leading officials. not so much with respect to that one action but by the truly sweeping powers he claims to himself and even if he is sincere in
east. but i think that it's remarkable, alex, really, to see the kind of praise that president morsi is receiving. even in those defiant speeches that ayman was referring to, hamas leaders, islamic jihad leaders, benjamin netanyahu's comments last night, secretary clinton's comments last night, president obama's praise, everybody has good things to say about morsi, who has now emerged not only as a can-do politician, but a power broker in the region. for instance, when the truce deal needed to be closed and clinton came to cairo, she spent hours with morsi and with his foreign minister, mohammed kamul, finding the compromise that israel and hamas could live with. mainly stop the hostilities today and negotiate the other demands later. alex? >> jim, thank you very much for that live report from cairo with the latest on the brokering of the truce. joining me now, former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. for special affairs, stewart is a special assistant to the president and is currently president and ceo of the nonpartisan meridian international center in washington. welcome, stewart, thank
jim's top courts today suspended their work in protest of president mohamed morsi's decr decree. joining me to talk more about the middle east is ambassador dennis ross, an expert on the region. he was the chief middle east negotiate for president clinton and president bush and served as a special adviser for president obama. he is a mideast analyst. both supporters and opponents are planning more giant protests on friday as well as sad. what's your assessment of the situation and the back and forth between the two sides? >> well, i think what we're seeing is is that this is a new egypt. anybody who thought that president morsi could come in and act like president mubarak and could rule as opposed to govern, there's no doubt that's not the case. there's no doubt he miscalculated. he thought in the aftermath of brokering a ceasefire between israel and hamas, that gave him a new standing internationally, gave him new stature in the region, and it did and he could somehow use that to convert it into new power within egypt himself. what he's finding is in fact the new egypt is an eg
? >> craig, elections have consequences and after all the egyptian people voted to put morsi and his party into power. the real struggle here as jim just mentioned is about the future of the parliament that was disbanded and the constitutional drafting committee whether or not in the end these two bodies will wind up reinforcing the islamization of egypt's society and this wasn't a close election so there is a divided country in egypt and this will have to play itself out. i don't think the united states should put took bogs in the fight at this point because we have bigger fish to fry to mix the metaphors up in gaza and the wore that morsi would play in helping to calm things down between israel and hamas. too much intervention at this point in time is not going to basically solve the overall problem for the united states and the middle east. >> i want to get your take on the republican opposition to susan rice who may be tapped to succeed hillary clinton over the weekend, the harshest critic, john mccain softening the rhetoric. let's take a listen. >> is there anything that ambassador ri
today, she's met already with president morsi. she's also wrapping up a meeting with the foreign minister and we understand at the press conference she's supposed to give has not started yet. but i can guarantee you that many people here in egypt and israel are intent on following that press conference. unlike yesterday, there have been no dramatic statements that a cease-fire will be declared at such and such a time. today it's more the reality of both sides, israel and hamas, getting bogged down in details. apparently, at least according to egyptian sources, they haven't yet been able to bridge differences. it's really unclear whether secretary clinton is carrying any specific proposals or if is she's here basically to nudge both sides into some kind of a compromise. but her presence here does give both sides the respected international i'd say political heavyweight to talk to, which certainly can't hurt. according to egyptian sources again, the main sticking point as we understand it seems to be over hamas' key demand, and it's not a surprising one, that that six-year-old bloc
earlier, the real man to watch here is mohammed morsi who is the safeguard, the guarantor of the hamas side of the cease fire agreement. he will be one of the key factors over there in 48 hours, 72 hours about whether or not this cease fire holds. all indications now in the morning new york time looked very dicey. i think it's been two or three hours. it seems like everybody is not going to hopefully turn this into a cease fire breaking event. we'll have to see. >> you talked about mow home home whom mid morsi. when it comes to enforcing what's happening miles away along this border, who is it that will do this? who is it that judges, yousef, whether it's a violation? >> sure. the bigger problem is it was very big. the other part of the problem is while the egyptians have good relations with israel and hamas, they have far more leverage over hamas. the so-called buffer zone that we see is exclusively on territory inside gaza. there's no buffer zone on the israeli side. there's no protection for the people of gaza from the israelis. that so-called buffer zone takes up 50% of the arabal
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

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